Excerpts on the Gospel of John

“It seems probable that Nathanael had had some outstanding experience of communion with God… and that it is this to which Jesus refers.Whatever it was, Nathanael was able to recognize the allusion.It is difficult to explain Jesus’ knowledge of the incident on the level of merely human knowledge. Nathanael had never met him before thismoment.We are required to understand that Jesus had some knowledge not generally available to the human race (cf.).” –Leon Morris, The Gospel According to John (Rvd.), p. 146

§

“The Son is the Father’s envoy plenitpotentiary, his perfect spokesman and revealer.” –F.F. Bruce

§

Eternal life is “the life of the age to come, experienced now even if consummated only later (cf. 5:20-21, 25-26; 17:2)… This does not collapse the notion of eschatological judgment into present, spiritual experience, since the future judgment remains(5:28-29).Rather, it isi n line with the New Testament insistence that the age to come can no longer be set off absolutely from the present age, now that Jesus the Messiah has come. Believers already enjoy the eternal life that will be consummated in the resurrection of their bodies at [Christ’s second coming]; unbelievers stand under the looming wrath of God that will be consummated in their resurrection and condemnation…”–D.A. Carson, The Gospel According to John, p. 214

§

“Jesus’ response in v. 4 seems harsh. To address one’s mother with the simple vocative, woman (gunai),seems abrupt, although we find the same word used in 19:26 when Jesusspeaks to his mother from the cross (cf. 4:21). Moreover, these arenumerous instances in the Synoptic Gospels of Jesus’ use of theexpression (e.g., Luke 13:12; Matthew 15:28),almost enough to say that it is represented as Jesus’ normal way ofaddressing a woman. But its use to address his mother suggests acertain reserve or aloofness as if to disavow any authority she mighthave over him. The expression translated What have you to do with me? tends to confirm that detachment. The Greek literally reads, ‘What to me and to you?’ (ti emoi kai soi).It may be a Semitic expression to suggest ‘the matter has nothing to dowith us.’ Certainly it declares a separation from the matter at handwith considerable sharpness (cf. instances in the Synoptics when wordsare used by demons to address Jesus—Mark 1:24; Matthew 8:29; Luke 8:28).Jesus here declares his freedom from any kind of human manipulation. He will not be controlled by his mother’s or any human’s desire. The Johannine Christ stands free of all human power, except as he wills tobe subject to that power, as is the case in the passion narrative. Heis a divine king whose sovereignty places him beyond human control. Itis sometimes a pattern in Johannine stories of Jesus’ encounter withhuman need first to rebuke the one asking for help, only to go on tofulfill the request (cf. 4:48ff. and 11:3ff.). That pattern is evidenthere.” –Robert Kysar, John, p. 45

Advertisements